About

This is the collective blog of all ten artists showing at the Crafts Council show ‘Collect 2012’ in the Saatchi Gallery, London.

COLLECT 11-14 May 2012

“COLLECT is the premier destination for anyone passionate about buying the very best in contemporary craft.”

“This prestigious fair, now in its fourth year at the Saatchi Gallery, London, presents 31 of the world’s finest international galleries representing exceptional work of museum quality from their portfolio of artists.
This stellar line-up of artists will occupy the ground and first floor of the Saatchi Gallery whilst the Project Space returns to the second floor, featuring ten installations by artists with a focus on textiles and furniture.” (http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/collect/)

Project Space

This year sees the return of the Project Space featuring ten installations by artists with a focus on textiles and furniture.


  • Knot (detail), 2007, cotton, polyester filling, machine and hand-stitched. Photo: Anna RayKnot (detail), 2007, cotton, polyester filling, machine and hand-stitched. Photo: Anna Ray

    Anna Ray

    Anna Ray has an open and multidisciplinary approach, embracing traditional methods of making and the latest technological developments.
    Knot is a complex padded structure made up of over 1,000 machine-stitched cotton elements with polyester filling. Inspired by the colour coding of metal under-wires in brassieres, the minute pixels that are the building blocks of digital images and the wooden game Pick-up-sticks. Knot aims to have no specific focal point but instead an intense surface to hold the eye of the viewer.

    Email: mail@annaray.co.uk
    Website: www.annaray.co.uk/

  • Working sketch, Crook & JonesWorking sketch, Crook & Jones

    Crook & Jones

    Geoff Crook and Peter Jones began their collaboration in 2010 to combine and contrast their different skills and interests. The partnership seeks to discover possibilities of function and form that evolve from unpredictable organic opportunities rather than the conventional.
    The Rhizome Project: Deleuze and Guattari assert that a ‘rhizome has no beginning or end…’ (A Thousand Plateaus, 1980)

    Email: info@crookandjones.co.uk
    Website: www.crookandjones.co.uk

  • Blueprints, 2008-11, 18 carat yellow gold or oxidised silver. Photo: Lucian TaylorBlueprints, 2008-11, 18 carat yellow gold or oxidised silver. Photo: Lucian Taylor

    Elizabeth Callinicos

    Blueprints: This installation of artefacts represents the culmination of a creative journey and a new departure. Referencing the ‘old and the new’, these jewellery objects explore notions of human fragility and skins through metaphorical vessel forms.

    +44 (0) 149 425 9522
    Email: info@studio-e174.co.uk

  • Because I love You, 2009. Free Machine Embroidery, applique and painting on canvas.Because I love You, 2009. Free Machine Embroidery, applique and painting on canvas.

    Me – Louise Gardiner

    Louise Gardiner’s embroidery and appliqué explores movement. She intuitively creates explosive, organic designs which emulate such spontaneous actions as seeds popping, propellers whizzing, fireworks and tumbleweed. These tactile embroideries are created by drawing freehand with a sewing machine, stitching areas of intricate detail, painting with a fine brush and layering different materials. These works have a subtle interaction with light, and push the boundaries between classic and kitsch.

    Email: louise@lougardiner.co.uk
    Website: www.lougardiner.co.uk

  • Since I Fell For You… (detail), 2010. Second-hand and vintage garments. Photo: David RamkalawonSince I Fell For You… (detail), 2010. Second-hand and vintage garments. Photo: David Ramkalawon

    Lucy Brown

    Offerings’: These works are inspired by bodily and emotive narratives around femaleness, (re)making and boundaries. Exploring ideas around re-invention through the act of weaving women’s old, second-hand and vintage clothing into ribbon warp, Offerings’ will be in a constant state of ‘becoming’.
    Offerings’ is being supported by the National Lottery through Arts Council England. The Theo Moorman Trust for Weavers has funded the material costs of the work.

    Email: lucy.brownis@btinternet.com
    Website: axisweb.org/artist/lucybrown

  • Untitled. Birch plywood, viscose rayon yarn. Photo: Maryrose WatsonUntitled. Birch plywood, viscose rayon yarn. Photo: Maryrose Watson

    Maryrose Watson

    This new collection from Maryrose Watson continues to develop her innovative method of constructing textiles. Yarn is passed both around and though the frame, interrupting the negative space, creating pieces that demonstrate the innate three-dimensionality of her work.

    Email: mail@maryrosewatson.co.uk
    Website: www.maryrosewatson.co.uk/

  • Chandelier, 2010. Japanese papercut. Photo: S. SoloChandelier, 2010. Japanese papercut. Photo: S. Solo

    Nahoko Kojima

    Nahoko Kojima’s Papercuts intertwine narrative and emotion using one continual line: a single canvas that is itself the artwork, every negative space balanced with a positive. Every stroke is considered, and permutations of shadow and light consummate the whole.

    Email: info@solokojima.com
    Website: www.naho.co.uk

  • No Place Like Home, 2010, ceramic. Photo: Matias AmorósNo Place Like Home, 2010, ceramic. Photo: Matias Amorós

    Rosa Cortiella

    No Place Like Home: Inspired by textile patterns and using ceramics as a means of expression, this project suggests taking a bit of our dining room in the middle of the street, garden or any public or private space.

    Email: mail@rosacortiella.com
    Website: www.rosacortiella.com

  • Susie, Stacy Brafield, 2010, videotape and pins. Photo: Stacy BrafieldSusie, Stacy Brafield, 2010, videotape and pins. Photo: Stacy Brafield

    Stacy Brafield

    A recreation of a memory of the Aura Borealis: The site specific installation captures the line, shape and movement of the northern lights in a still image. Creating a disco-y-syrup that spans across the wall.

    Email: stacybrafield@gmail.com
    Website: www.stacybrafield.com

  • Rough and Ready Collection, 2010. Wool Felt and Polyurethane Rubber. Photo: Matjaz TancicRough and Ready Collection, 2010. Wool felt and polyurethane rubber. Photo: Matjaz Tancic

    Vanja Bazdulj

    Rough & Ready seating morphology: This is an experimental furniture morphology inspired by exploring the potentials of the imperfect, human, unpredictable, the unfinished ‘finish’ look aesthetics and independence in work process: ‘I don’t need no Fancy tools’. Object designs are focused on exploring ambiguous forms, materials out of context and a playful approach to making. The morphology is created from a material compound of industrial wool felt and rubber, where the rubber spill functions as structural reinforcement and is inevitably recording the work process and creating aesthetic patterns. Tailored cured sheets of different densities wool felt are assembled and tightened into place with rope, forming seating elements. All material is prepared by hand, making each piece a unique version.
    The play of form and structure is obvious in the unusual appearance inviting surprise and questioning of function leading to a realisation that the chairs are in fact comfortable, soft and sturdy.

    Email: info@vanjabazdulj.com
    Website: www.vanjabazdulj.com

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